Littlest Vintage – Shopping for vintage in Adelaide

Littlest Vintage

 

Littlest Vintage – Shopping for vintage in Adelaide

I first spoke to this dynamic trio when they opened their store  in 2011. Four years later i talk to Lauren about Littlest Vintage and how their business has grown and evolved and what changes she has seen in the industry.

You can read our original interview from 2011; find the ink at the bottom of the page.

  • What has been the biggest change to your store since then?

Lauren: It’s hard to say what the biggest change has been. Our business is continually evolving and expanding. We now do lots of custom pieces (made from vintage materials) and event styling. Our side project ‘that dapper market’ has also grown immensely.

Our business has gone from soley a retail venture, into a multi-faceted one. This means we’re now looking to move ‘littlest’ into a large warehouse venue — somewhere we can have a shop, workshop and studio all in the one space.

Littlest Vintage

 

  • Have your roles changed within the business?

We’ve gone from a trio to a duo since one of our founder’s, Mecia, now works as a social worker. Matt and I  don’t really have set roles. We both work on pretty much all facets of littlest together.

  • In the last few years, what area of vintage do you think has become more popular & why?

There has definitely been a shift from retro to rustic. But lots of styles seem to go in waves/cycles.

 

Littlest Vintage

 

Littlest Vintage

 

  • What types of vintage wares can we find in your store?

Vintage and rustic furniture and collectables, locally-made giftware and accessories and a bit of vintage clothing sourced abroad.

  • Is there a particular area (such as industrial or mid-century) of vintage wares that you specialise in particularly?

We love depression-era pieces,  character pieces (that show signs of their previous lives) and Matt loves vintage taxidermy so you’re always likely to find an old soul (or five) in the store.

Littlest Vintage

 

  • You have the most beautifully styled vintage photography; do you use a professional stylist?

Why thank you! We don’t use a stylist. I pretty much operate on what Matt likes to call a crazy ‘anti-gravity’ approach in which furniture/items are held in place for a display through willpower and perhaps a few colourful words. Oh and I do like to wedge our shop dog, Johnny into a pic wherever possible.

 

15 Littlest Vintage

Littlest Vintage

Littlest Vintage

  • Any hints or tips on how on styling you can share?

We like to create large displays that appear to be somewhat of an organised chaos. I like to either create a display using similar types of objects or completely disparate pieces. Eg once we displayed a bunch of vintage mincers filled with succulents and the mincers all ended up selling to people wanting to make mincer planters. My advice would be to play with items and try presenting them in unconventional ways — but you may want to wear a helmet when playing jenga with armchairs.

Littlest Vintage

 

  • If you knew what you know now, is there anything you would have done differently?

Nah, every hiccup is just an opportunity to learn.

  • What can we expect from littlest vintage in the next 3 years from now?

When we find the perfect new space, littlest will become a heck of a lot larger. In three years from now we hope to be operating as a shop, rental business, workshop and creative-practice studio. Most importantly we see littlest as continuing to share lovely vintage goods with vintage-loving folks.

Littlest Vintage

Littlest Vintage

Littlest Vintage

91 Glen Osmond Road, Eastwood. South Australia

wed-sat 11-5. sun 11-3.

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Read our store interview from 2011

Littlest Vintage

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